Health Topic: Incontinence

Urinary incontinence (UI), also known as involuntary urination, is any leakage of urine. It is a common and distressing problem, which may have a large impact on quality of life. Urinary incontinence is often a result of an underlying medical condition but is under-reported to medical practitioners.[1] Enuresis is often used to refer to urinary incontinence primarily in children, such as nocturnal enuresis (bed wetting).[2]

There are four main types of incontinence:[3]

  • Urge incontinence It is an involuntary loss of urine that usually occurs when a person has a strong, sudden need to urinate. Urge incontinence is not a disease. Rather, it is a sign that there is an underlying problem
  • Stress incontinence due to poor closure of the bladder. Stress incontinence happens when physical movement or activity — such as coughing, sneezing, running or heavy lifting — puts pressure (stress) on your bladder. Stress incontinence is not related to psychological stress
  • Overflow incontinence due to either poor bladder contraction or blockage of the urethra
  • Functional incontinence due to medications or health problems making it difficult to reach the bathroom
  • mix incontinence :Because mixed incontinence is typically a combination of stress and urge incontinence, it shares symptoms of both. You may have mixed incontinence if you experience the following symptomsed:
  • overflow incontinence: Overflow incontinence occurs when you are unable to completely empty your bladder; this leads to overflow, which leaks out unexpectedly
back to top